January Wrap-Up

Reading


Otherworld | The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes | Deathnote #8 | The Power | The Hypnotist’s Love Story | The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes | Truly Madly Guilty | Everless | Lost Boy | Deathnote #9 | Mythos | Battlemage

Books read: 12
Pages read: 4186
Average pages per day: 135
Average book length: 349 pages
Favourite: Mythos & The Battlemage

Watching

Coco – Really enjoyed.  Not the best Pixar film, but up there in my top few!
Downsizing –
Utterly odd. I’m not sure what I was expecting, or ultimately what this was trying to be, but it was just a bit strange. Not sure I’d recommend.
The Greatest Showman –
Seriously LOVED and have been listening to the soundtrack non-stop.

Avatar The Last Airbender (Season 3) – It’s been a long time coming, but I’ve finally finished this… and now I’m disappointed it’s over!
Manhunt: Unabomber (Episodes 1-7) –
A bit slow, but fascinating. Just haven’t had a chance to watch the finale yet!
Once Upon a Time (5 x 13-22) –
I loved OuaT when it started, but it went really downhill. I’m giving it another go in the hopes it’ll pick back up, but so far I’m still waiting.
Big Little Lies (Season 1) –
So addictive! Great soundtrack, great acting and I thought it was a great adaptation.

Blogging

Reviews:


Other posts:

NetGalley % change: -1% (74%)

Challenge Updates

Sci-fi vs Fantasy Bingo
AI: Otherworld
Dystopia: The Power
Re-Telling: Lost Boy: The True Story of Captain Hook
Demonic: The Battlemage

Beat the Backlist (4/48)

Finishing the Series (1/15)
Battlemage

Goodreads (12/100)

Personal Goals

Lost 4lbs (4/ ~42)

How was your January?

Skitter (Ezekiel Boone)

Skitter (Ezekiel Boone)Skitter (The Hatching #2) by Ezekiel Boone
on January 1st 1970
Genres: Horror, Post-apocalyptic, Science Fiction
Format: Hardback
Source: Library
Goodreads

Tens of millions of people around the world are dead. Half of China is a nuclear wasteland. Mysterious flesh-eating spiders are marching through Los Angeles, Oslo, Delhi, Rio de Janeiro, and countless other cities. According to scientist Melanie Guyer, however, the spider situation seems to be looking up. Yet in Japan, a giant, truck-sized, glowing egg sack gives a shocking preview of what is to come, even as survivors in Los Angeles panic and break the quarantine zone. Out in the desert, survivalists Gordo and Shotgun are trying to invent a spider super weapon, but it’s not clear if it’s too late, because President Stephanie Pilgrim has been forced to enact the plan of last resort: The Spanish Protocol. America, you are on your own.

SPOILER ALERT: As this is book 2 in The Hatching series, there will be spoilers for The Hatching throughout this review.

Plot: ★★
Characters: ★★★
Readability: ★★★

I was addicted to The Hatching, so I went into Skitter with high hopes – and sadly, the book didn’t live up to those at all.  Looking at the goodreads reviews, I’m definitely in the minority with my opinion, so you might love it, but I thought it was a classic case of middle book syndrome.  The Hatching was great – the problem started seemingly small, and rapidly expanded.  We saw what seemed like mostly unrelated characters discover the problem and try to cope with it, revealing their possible connections in the process.  It was fast-paced, it was creepy, and it went straight onto my list of instant-favourite-post-apocalyptic books.

And then came Skitter.  I don’t even really know where to start reviewing this, except that to say that somehow for a dramatic book, I feel like this was a case of running in place without getting anywhere.  I feel like the only purpose of the book was to take the big disaster of book 1, and make it a HUGE CATASTROPHE ready for book 3.  Aside from a few fun interactions between characters, I felt like basically everything in this book could have been accomplished just as easily with a time-jump between the first book and the last, cutting this one out altogether.  Instead, we had a book that felt mostly like filler, and given how much I loved the first one, it was very disappointing for this one to feel like, to be frank, a bit of a waste of time.  I’ll still be picking up book three, but I do feel like perhaps Mr Boone/the publishers felt this had to be a trilogy because that’s what sells, when really it would have been a fantastic duology.  On the plus side, it’s a quick read, I just didn’t feel like I got much out of it.

This Mortal Coil (Emily Suvada)

This Mortal Coil (Emily Suvada)This Mortal Coil by Emily Suvada
Published by Penguin Books Ltd on November 2nd 2017
Genres: Dystopia, Science Fiction, Young Adult
Pages: 464
Format: Paperback
Source: Borrowed
Goodreads

When a lone soldier, Cole, arrives with news of Lachlan Agatta's death, all hope seems lost for Catarina. Her father was the world's leading geneticist, and humanity's best hope of beating a devastating virus. Then, hidden beneath Cole's genehacked enhancements she finds a message of hope: Lachlan created a vaccine.

Only she can find and decrypt it, if she can unravel the clues he left for her. The closer she gets, the more she finds herself at risk from Cartaxus, a shadowy organization with a stranglehold on the world's genetic tech. But it's too late to turn back.

There are three billion lives at stake, two people who can save them, and one final secret that Cat must unlock. A secret that will change everything.

Plot: ★★★★
Characters: ★★
Readability: ★★★★★

I expected to love This Mortal Coil – science, basically zombies, end-of-the world? These are serious buzz words for me!

Good things first: This Mortal Coil was immensely readable.  It’s more than 400 pages long, and yet despite that I flew through it in three days, squeezing it into every spare moment around work.  The story is full of twists and turns that made sure I didn’t want to put it down. The science is great – it reminded me of The Martian, in that both books give you actual science and just expect you to keep up, which I absolutely loved.  Cat’s smart, and feisty, and likeable. The world is genuinely interesting, and believable, and complex.

Onto the less good: for a book with so many twists and turns, I thought the ending was predictable. I felt a bit like the overall story was very predictable, and so Suvada had deliberately tried to make the story more convoluted and unexpected to try and distract from that – while that made it an addictive read, some of the twists also felt a bit like unecessary diversions, and the book could easily have been a fair amount shorter.  There’s a love triangle which wasn’t my favourite thing, but it wasn’t overwhelming or too angsty so it definitely wasn’t a dealbreaker.

This book definitely seems to be polarizing: most of the reviews I’ve read have either been adoring or hating, with not much in the middle. For me, despite the flaws, it was an interesting read and I’m certainly intrigued to see where the rest of the series goes if I can borrow a copy, but I won’t be rushing out to buy one.

One StarOne StarOne Star

Iron Gold (Pierce Brown)

Iron Gold (Pierce Brown)Iron Gold (Red Rising Saga #4) by Pierce Brown
Published by Hodder & Stoughton on January 16th 2018
Pages: 634
Goodreads

They call him father, liberator, warlord, Reaper. But he feels a boy as he falls toward the pale blue planet, his armor red, his army vast, his heart heavy. It is the tenth year of war and the thirty-second of his life.

A decade ago, Darrow was the hero of the revolution he believed would break the chains of the Society. But the Rising has shattered everything: Instead of peace and freedom, it has brought endless war. Now he must risk everything he has fought for on one last desperate mission. Darrow still believes he can save everyone, but can he save himself?

And throughout the worlds, other destinies entwine with Darrow’s to change his fate forever:

A young Red girl flees tragedy in her refugee camp and achieves for herself a new life she could never have imagined.

An ex-soldier broken by grief is forced to steal the most valuable thing in the galaxy—or pay with his life.

And Lysander au Lune, the heir in exile to the sovereign, wanders the stars with his mentor, Cassius, haunted by the loss of the world that Darrow transformed, and dreaming of what will rise from its ashes.

Red Rising was the story of the end of one universe, and Iron Gold is the story of the creation of a new one. Witness the beginning of a stunning new saga of tragedy and triumph from masterly New York Times bestselling author Pierce Brown.

SPOILER ALERT: As this is book 4 in the Red Rising series, there will be spoilers for earlier books in the series throughout this review.

Plot: ★★★★
Characters: ★★★
Readability: ★★★

Where to start with Iron Gold?! It’s no secret that I adore this series – I gave Red Rising 4 stars and both Golden Son and Morning Star 5 stars – so I went into Iron Gold with seriously high expectations.  I was very nervous too though: would the time gap and character changes ruin everything? Would I connect to the new characters?In Iron Gold, we’re no longer only concerned with Darrow and his friends.  Brown gives us four point of view characters – Darrow, Lyria, Ephraim and Lysander – some of whom we already know, and others of whom are new to us.  Even the characters we think we know aren’t unchanged by the events of Morning Star, so there’s character development for all of the characters throughout the story, and I found myself enjoying the chapters from all four points of view.  Having said that, the characters have always been one of Red Rising’s strengths, and I didn’t truly love any of the new characters.  Lysander’s chapters narrowly edged out the others in terms of addictiveness for me, despite the fact he’s almost the total opposite of Sevro, my favourite character in the series.

A lot has changed in the 10 years since the conclusion of Morning Star, so although we’re returning to a world we already know there’s plenty of new world-building information to pick up.  With it’s four POV characters, including a Darrow who has exponentially more power and freedom than ever before, Iron Gold also gives the impression of a much larger world than the earlier books in the series.  These two things add up to make it feel a lot like the start of a new series, and I have to admit it took me a while to get my head around a world which feels more developed but also more complicated than ever before.  We’ve got lots of different power players, all of whom believe they’re the hero of their own story.  These morally grey, complex characters make for really interesting reading, and combined with the political elements of the story, help the series to feel more adult.

Until now, every book I’ve read from Brown has been better than the last, and it feels a little disloyal to say, but Iron Gold didn’t follow that trend for me.  I enjoyed it, but I didn’t love it as much as I expected to, and it took me three weeks to read.  I missed some of my favourite characters, who felt like they were only occasionally there in the background.  On the other hand, I loved the moral complexities, and I’m still in love with the world Brown has created, so I’ll see if I feel differently on a re-read, and I’ll definitely be reading Dark Age when it arrives.

One StarOne StarOne Star

Lord of Shadows (Cassandra Clare)

Lord of Shadows (Cassandra Clare)Lord of Shadows by Cassandra Clare
Published by Margaret K. McElderry Books on May 23rd 2017
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult
Pages: 701
Source: Purchased
Goodreads

Would you trade your soul mate for your soul?

A Shadowhunter’s life is bound by duty. Constrained by honor. The word of a Shadowhunter is a solemn pledge, and no vow is more sacred than the vow that binds parabatai, warrior partners—sworn to fight together, die together, but never to fall in love.

Emma Carstairs has learned that the love she shares with her parabatai, Julian Blackthorn, isn’t just forbidden—it could destroy them both. She knows she should run from Julian. But how can she when the Blackthorns are threatened by enemies on all sides?

Their only hope is the Black Volume of the Dead, a spell book of terrible power. Everyone wants it. Only the Blackthorns can find it. Spurred on by a dark bargain with the Seelie Queen, Emma; her best friend, Cristina; and Mark and Julian Blackthorn journey into the Courts of Faerie, where glittering revels hide bloody danger and no promise can be trusted. Meanwhile, rising tension between Shadowhunters and Downworlders has produced the Cohort, an extremist group of Shadowhunters dedicated to registering Downworlders and “unsuitable” Nephilim. They’ll do anything in their power to expose Julian’s secrets and take the Los Angeles Institute for their own.

When Downworlders turn against the Clave, a new threat rises in the form of the Lord of Shadows—the Unseelie King, who sends his greatest warriors to slaughter those with Blackthorn blood and seize the Black Volume. As dangers close in, Julian devises a risky scheme that depends on the cooperation of an unpredictable enemy. But success may come with a price he and Emma cannot even imagine, one that will bring with it a reckoning of blood that could have repercussions for everyone and everything they hold dear.

SPOILER ALERT: As this is book 2 in The Dark Artifices series, there will be spoilers for Lady Midnight throughout this review.

Plot: ★★★★
Characters: ★★★★
Readability: ★★★★★

Given my somewhat inconsistent opinions of Cassandra Clare’s books in the past, I was nervous about Lady Midnight – but then ended up loving it! I bought Lord of Shadows as soon as I had an audible credit, and I binge listened to both books in a row.  I have to admit, part of my motivation for getting the audiobooks was that I knew Lord of Shadows was narrated by James Marsters, one of my favourite narrators (although I miss his Spike accent!).  Picking an audiobook based on the narrator might seem like a pretty risky strategy, but it paid off in this case – I enjoyed Lord of Shadows even more than Lady Midnight.

I felt like we got to see more of the Blackthorn siblings in Lord of Shadows, and I really enjoyed that. I adore Ty, and I’m definitely a not-so-secret Ty and Kit shipper!  The romance element got heavier in Lord of Shadows, which could have been a dealbreaker for me, given that I didn’t love the romance in Lady Midnight, but there was enough here to enjoy to more than balance it out.  Three love triangles are definitely too many, especially when I feel like two of them have a clear way they should pan out (in my head at least).  Feeling like they’ve got an obvious resolution takes away some of the intensity, and instead just felt like a slightly annoying, predictable way to try and ramp up the intensity.

Having said that, I love a lot of the characters, so I’m willing to overlook some of their irritating romance habits to a certain extent.  Mark and Kieran are both pretty emotionally damaged, and those are my favourite kind of characters, so it’s no surprise I’d love them! Christina and Emma are kickass, and Kit and Ty are just kind of adorable.  I mostly just feel a bit bad for Dru, who seems to always get a crappy deal – she’s very relatable, but I do occasionally want to shake her a bit!  Livvy is the weakest character in the family for me, I just find her a bit strange and forgettable.  Tavvy hasn’t had much of an impact either but he’s only little still so I’m not really expecting him to! Maybe it’s just because Ty is such a good character, that I can’t help feeling Livvy is somewhat flat in comparison.

As with Lady Midnight, I found the plot addictive, and burned through this very quickly: 10 days for a ~24 hour audiobook is way above average pace for me!  There is a cliffhanger, so if you’re not fond of those, it might be worth waiting and binge-reading the trilogy all in one go, but having read the first one and knowing the second one was out, I couldn’t convince myself to wait!

One StarOne StarOne StarOne StarOne Star